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Slidell Memorial Hospital



FAQs

VISION

In keeping with Slidell Memorial Hospital's mission to improve the quality of life in our community, the new Regional Cancer Center allows the hospital to strengthen its surgical oncology subspecialties; establish and promote highly specialized multi-disciplinary disease teams; and allow for continued enhancement and growth of programs such as patient supportive care services and a formalized patient navigator program.
 
Click here to view the SMH Regional Cancer Center's 2011 Annual Report.

Construction
  • Construction details
  • History of Bond
  • What is the history of the bond/millage that will pay for the investment in this new regional cancer center?
  • Investment
  • How much will this entire project cost?
  • Why build the Cancer Center now?
  • Services
  • What services will be provided?
  • Specifications
  • How large is the new Cancer Center?
  • Why did SMH plan for extra space?
  • Will there be physician offices in the space?
  • Technology
  • What equipment will be located in the new cancer center?
  • What is the biggest advantage of having one center for all of the equipment?
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    Construction
     
    Q: Construction details
    A: • Architect: AE Design of Marietta, Ga.
    • General Contractor: Citadel Builders LLC of Metairie,
    • Subcontractors: Duplantis Design Group of Thibodaux; Wardlaw & Lasseigne LLC, Baton Rouge; CRS Engineering & Design Consultants, Birmingham, Ala.; Louisiana Landscape Specialty Inc., Baton Rouge.
    • Approximately 200 construction jobs will be created for development of the center.

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    History of Bond
     
    Q: What is the history of the bond/millage that will pay for the investment in this new regional cancer center?
    A: When SMH went out to voters in November 2007 to seek a bond issue to construct a state-of-the-art regional cancer center, property owners overwhelmingly approved the referendum, with some 80 percent of voters supporting the measure.

    Voters authorized SMH to fund the new cancer center with a $17.5 million, 20-year bond by rededicating a 2004 series bond expected to be funded by continuing the current property tax rate of 7 mills. With the growth in population and property owners paying the millage, projections are that the current 7 mills or less will be adequate to pay off the bonds.

    Additional funding for this project will come from the hospital’s cash reserves.

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    Investment
     
    Q: How much will this entire project cost?
    A: Cost estimates for the construction and equipment for this cutting-edge facility are just over $19 million, approximately $3 million under the initial budget.
    • Construction including soft costs $14,040,421
    • Equipment $5, 208,000
    • Total Project Budget $19,248,421

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    Q: Why build the Cancer Center now?
    A: The Center will provide citizens with leading-edge diagnostics and treatment protocols and a multispecialty approach. The regional population is projected to grow by more than 10 percent and the incidence of cancer to increase significantly in coming years due, in part, to the aging of the population. By constructing this new cancer center, SMH is continuing to be at the forefront of meeting the healthcare needs of our community.

    We anticipate the center will attract patients from a wider market area, including Louisiana, Mississippi and the Gulf South region.

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    Services
     
    Q: What services will be provided?
    A: Services will include Radiation Therapy including high-dose radiation brachytherapy, Image-guided radiosurgery and radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy. The center also will feature an Infusion Center, full-time Pharmacy, an Appearance Center and Cancer Resource Center.

    A direct and visible benefit to patients will be the creation of a fully developed Patient Navigator program, which assigns a specific person to guide newly diagnosed cancer patients through their treatment.

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    Specifications
     
    Q: How large is the new Cancer Center?
    A: The center will be a three-story structural steel frame building with a full-height, three-level glass-enclosed atrium. Total square footage is 51,483. Initially, two-thirds of the space will be occupied for treatment, physician offices and consultation with room for additional growth. The building’s exterior is brick and punched windows.
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    Q: Why did SMH plan for extra space?
    A: As one of the fastest-growing regions in the country, and with the aging of the American population, we are planning for the future so that we can handle additional growth in population and in disease incidences.
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    Q: Will there be physician offices in the space?
    A: SMH has secured leases with two medical oncology physician groups. Space is available on the third floor for additional physician leasing. All of the doctors locating in the new cancer center will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and related diseases.
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    Technology
     
    Q: What equipment will be located in the new cancer center?
    A: All cancer treatment and cancer-specific diagnostic equipment currently located in SMH will become centralized in the new center. SMH utilizes much of the latest technology and equipment available for fighting and diagnosing cancer. This includes: the Varian Image-guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) system used in both radiosurgery and more precise, targeted radiation treatment; CT Scanners and a new GE 16-slice CT Scan simulator with four-dimensional respiratory gating capabilities. The center also will feature a comfortable Infusion Center for patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    SMH also will add an additional linear accelerator to its IGRT system to increase the number of patients that can be treated.

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    Q: What is the biggest advantage of having one center for all of the equipment?
    A: The National Institutes of Cancer says that 95 percent of all cancers can be more effectively treated close to home at a nearby center. This is because a strong family and social network is an essential part of healing, and because a one-stop shop for treatment, counseling and physician visits puts less stress on the patient and family. Additionally, physicians can discuss cases collaboratively.
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